Thursday, 22 June 2017

This deserves a round of applause...

Unlike yesterday's so-called revolutionary Day of Rage, which deserved this reaction:

"Something in Arabic"? Gee, I wonder what it was...

Choose one of the following options...

(1) Excuse me, officer, I just wanted to thank you for your ongoing efforts to keep us all safe...

Wednesday, 21 June 2017

A brilliant leader from The Sun - and BBC News's new strong, silent approach

Pity the Conservative Party chose not to...

The best and worst of Twitter in a time of madness

It's too hot to write anything, so here's a round-up of appalling, amusing and sensible tweets posted in the last few days, starting with revolutionary socialist, Diane Abbott, slamming the privileged elite:
...which is no doubt why her party wants to shut down all private schools. Meanwhile, the woman who was almost Home Secretary - and still might be - views terrorist attacks on Muslims as "terror attacks", while terrorist attacks by Muslims are merely "incidents":

Thursday, 15 June 2017

I may owe Tommy Robinson an apology

As a right-wing conservative, I resent parties of the so-called Far Right, because, since the 1930s, they've been used by the Left to give people like me a bad name. This, the Guardian columnist or the Labour MP proclaim, pointing to, for instance, the BNP or the National Front or whoever, is what right-wing conservatives really believe (much as people like me are only too ready to accuse soft-left Labourites of being Trotskyist agitators at heart - a harder charge for them to dismiss, given their increasing participation in a Corbyn-led Labour Party). I resent being called far right or fascist, because I don't agree with most of their policies, I am philo-Semitic, and I don't see deliberate street violence as a legitimate form of protest in a democratic country. Far Right parties have far more in common with the totalitarian Left that with right-wing conservatives: if I were an extremist (which I'm not), I'd more likely be a freedom-loving, gun-toting libertarian, happy for people to go to hell in their own handcart as long as I didn't have to pick up the tab for their recklessness, weakness, selfishness and stupidity...

This YouGov election statistics page is a must-read - men saved us from disaster

Well done, you men - you 6% bias in favour of the Tories saved us! The other most significant statistic, I think, is this one:

Wednesday, 14 June 2017

Brendan O'Neill: Jeremy Corbyn isn't hard left, and it's the educated middle classes who almost won it for Labour

I've avoided reading too much analysis of the election results since last Friday. Right-of-centre commentators have been all over the place - it was the manifesto, Mrs. May's unappealing personality, too much Brexit, too little Brexit etc. Despite arithmetic, the Left seem convinced that they won the election. Blairites have either cravenly lined up behind the Dear Leader - or have been snapping and snarling at everyone like angry pitbulls who haven't had their dinner. It's all been a bit hysterical and noisy. So I thought I'd leave it for a bit before re-engaging. I have now done so. As so often in recent years, the most interesting thoughts seem have come from Brendan O'Neill, the Spectator contributor and editor of Spiked Online. First, in The Rise of Labour, the Death of Labourism, he argues (convincingly, I think) that Labour owed its surge more to middle-class voters in better-off areas than to its traditional working class base:

Why do young people vote Labour? They've been taught to. And it's going to get worse.

If you're a secondary school pupil, eight out of ten of your teachers vote for left-wing parties. Presumably...